University of Mississippi

2014 Spring Course Descriptions

HIS 301-1        Colonial America
Dr. Antoinette Sutto
M W F 02:00 PM – 02:50 PM
Bishop Room 103

This course examines the history of early America from the late 1500s to 1740. It begins with the meeting in North America of three groups of people – Europeans, Native Americans and Africans. By the end of the 1600s, decades of contact, exchange, cooperation, conflict and violence had fundamentally reshaped the landscape of eastern North America. By the 1700s the people who lived there were connected to one another and to the wider world by numerous ties of culture, trade and political allegiance. There were many conflicts — this was by no means a peaceful or a simple world. Through a mixture of primary and secondary sources, this course explores a variety of topics, including migration, trade and economic development, servitude and slavery, religion, culture and politics.

 

HIS 304-1        U.S. History, 1877-1918: Nation Redefined
Dr. Wendy Smith
M W F 11:00 – 11:50 AM
Bishop Room 112
This course will examine the social, political and cultural changes that occur from the end of Reconstruction to the end of WWI.  Themes will include (but are not limited to) changes in the American West, the growth of big business and labor unions, Populism, the Spanish-American War, US imperialism, the Progressive Era and America’s role in and reaction to WWI.  Discussions will include aspects of race, gender and religion as the class explores the transformation of the United States during this period.  Students will be expected to complete several reading and writing assignments, including essay style midterm and final exams.

 
HIS 305-1        The United States, World War I -1945
Ms. Telisha Dionne Bailey
M W F 10:00 AM – 10:50 AM
Bishop Room 105
 

The purpose of this course is to examine United States history through a political, social, and cultural lens that traces the developments in United States history from the World War I era to the end of the World War II era.  This course will examine Progressivism, World War I, the Roaring 20s, The Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression and New Deal Era, World War II, and the Origins of both the Cold War and Civil Rights Movement.  A recurring theme in the course will be the formation of the modern United States with an emphasis on the expansion of local, state, and federal governments and the importance of race in American society.  The course is divided into two sections:  In the first part of the course, we will examine the transformation of the United States into the world’s leading industrial nation, and the new ethno cultural mix that produced the conflict over the direction of the country in the years before WWI.  We will explore the effects of the war on U.S. economy politics and society, as well as explore the “new economy” and “old politics of the 1920s.  In the second part of the course, we will examine the Harlem Renaissance, the causes and consequences of the depression and New Deal era, WWII, and the effects that the depression and WWII had on economy politics and society in both the U.S and globally. We will use a number of traditional and non-traditional sources to help students think critically and analytically about the course work.  In addition to learning the general narrative of this period, students will also gain an understanding of why certain events took place when they did and how these events influenced modern society.

 
HIS 306-1        The United States Since 1945
Dr. Christopher Hickman
T TH 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Hume Room 203

HIS 306 surveys the history of the United States since the completion of the Second World War.  The course will include the standard coverage of the hallmarks of contemporary U.S. history, from the foundations of the cold war through the important changes in American politics, particularly those that date from the 1960s.  The lectures and discussions in the classroom environment will feature a near equal split between matters involving domestic politics, foreign policy, U.S. social thought and various sources of cultural evidence that help us appreciate the unique (and some not so unique) sources of what some would have us believe is a fragmented country.  The six-plus decades since August 1945 have provided ample evidence of American power throughout the rest of the world.  As such, the consequences of the various roles of the United States beyond its borders will merit our particular attention in this course.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
As a result of completing this course (HIS 306), students will be able:
1. To become more familiar with the manner by which historians employ primary sources in their question framing, investigations, and writing about the past.
2. To discuss, in an intelligible and knowledgeable manner, the significance of some of the more important and telling primary sources about the United States and its history since 1945.
3. To understand and be able to discuss in an intelligible and knowledgeable manner the capstone interpretations (and events) of the United States and its history since the Second World War, affording particular attention to the world of politics, law, diplomacy, social thought, education policy and popular culture. The additional secondary source texts for this course will help engender this learning outcome.
4. To learn to recognize instances, both in the past and closer to the present, when social commentators, writers, politicians and others in the public sphere draw upon the past in communicating ideas and analysis of present circumstances.
5.  To think critically about evidence and interpretations provided in our sources and classroom environment with an ultimate goal of improved student communication skills.

REQUIRED COURSE TEXTS
1. H.W. Brands America Since 1945
2. J. Samuel Walker Prompt and Utter Destruction
3. David Courtwright, No Right Turn
4. Ernest May The 9-11 Commission Report with Related Documents

HIS 306-2        The United States Since 1945
Dr. John “Jack” Fiorini
T TH 02:30 PM – 03:45 PM
Hume Room 203
This course explores the narratives of U.S. history since World War II. To do so, the class will survey many of the critical events, people, trends, and turning points that historians use to understand this time period and its significance. But, bearing in mind that history is an interpretive discipline, students will also read numerous sources that will allow them to begin exploring the complexities and nuances of these topics. The sources will expand on, complicate, or challenge each other and the lecture material. Thinking about how they do so is the essence of historical scholarship, and students will spend the semester honing their analytical skills and using them to develop a better understanding of American history since 1945 and of the process of history in general.
HIS 308-1        African American History Since 1865
Dr. Charles Ross
T TH 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Bryant Room 209
Aas 326/His 308 is an introduction to African American history from 1865 to the present, emphasizing the role of black leaders, the struggle against oppression, and the evolution of race relations.  Themes treated in the course include: successes and failures of Reconstruction, rise of legal segregation and the age of lynching, black leadership at the turn of the century, black participation in World War I, the Harlem Renaissance and the 1920s, the depression and New Deal effects on African Americans, World War II and African Americans, the 1960s and the black revolution, Vietnam, the conservative thrust of the 1980s and contemporary developments of the late twentieth century.
Academic Objectives:
In this course I want you to develop the following skills and competencies:

1.  To develop the ability to assess and think critically about historical issues and how        people interpret those issues.
2.  To gain a basic factual knowledge of this historical period.
3.  To develop some skills in analyzing historical data and reaching informed conclusions       about that data.
Course Requirements:
Each student is responsible for (1) class attendance and class participation, (2) weekly reading assignments, and (3) three examinations, and paper.

Method of Determining Final Course Grade:
1st Exam:                     30%
2nd Exam:                     30%
Paper:                          10%
Final Exam:                 30%
HIS 308-2        African American History Since 1865
Dr. Shennette Garrett-Scott
T TH 01:00 PM – 02:15 PM
Bishop Room 103

 
When one ponders the question “What drives history?”, the engine usually falls within the broad realms of either economics, ideology, or politics. Economics might be imagined as the eternal competition for resources or the drive to possess the fruits of this life. Ideology is the realm of ideas, feelings, and beliefs that animate and excite us to confront and meet challenges. Politics is the equally eternal desire to bend the wills of others to one’s own or to create possibilities for others. Indeed, the most unforgettable historical moments occur when all three of these processes entwine.

In our survey of African American History since 1865 to the present, we will break down these processes to their most fundamental elements: money, sex, and power. In discussions, lectures, and readings, we will explore how these forces shaped—and were shaped by—the African American experience in the making of America and “Americanness” from the end of the Civil War to the present. In particular, we will examine the various strategies African Americans used to resist racial, sexual, and class oppression and to gain full rights as American citizens. We will also look at intraracial dynamics to explore how African Americans grappled with—and sometimes failed to meet—the challenges presented by race and identity, gender and sexuality, and class and privilege within their own communities.

The course will privilege African American’s economic activities and the experiences of Afro-Mississippians.

Course Requirements
1) Personal blog (10%)
2) Chapter quizzes (15%)
3) Primary source analyses (15%)
4) Take-home mid-term exam (15%)
5) Final exam (15%)
6) 5-7 page research paper, including class presentation (30%)

Extra credit opportunities, such as attending outside lectures, will also be available.

Sample of Readings
The following list represents only a sample of readings for the course. In some instances, we will read selected essays from these books and, in a few others, read the entire work. I have not listed here shorter works such as journal articles. The list is subject to change.

Nancy Bercaw, Gendered Freedoms: Race, Rights, and the Politics of Household in the Delta, 1861-1875 (University of Florida Press, 2003)
Todd Boyd, Young, Black, Rich and Famous: The Rise of the NBA, the Hip Hop Invasion and the Transformation of American Culture (Doubleday, 2003)
Stephanie Dunn, “Baad Bitches” and Sassy Supermamas: Black Power Action Films (University of Illinois Press, 2008)
Steve Estes, I Am a Man!: Race, Manhood, and the Civil Rights Movement (University of North Carolina Press, 2005)
Tiffany Gill, Beauty Shop Politics: African American Women’s Activism in the Beauty Industry (University of Illinois Press, 2010)
James Jones, Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment (Free Press, 2011)
LeeAnna Keith, The Colfax Massacre: The Untold Story of Black Power, White Terror, and the Death of Reconstruction (Oxford University Press, 2009)
 

HIS 311-1        History of Japan-United States Relations
Dr. Meghan Warner (Mettler)
T TH 04:00 PM – 05:15 PM
Bishop Room 103
 

This course examines the relationship between Japan and the United States from the mid-19th through the 20th centuries. It will explore the complex and constantly changing relationship between the two nations, in both peace and war, by considering social and cultural issues, as well as economic and political concerns.

HIS 314-1        Survey of Native America since 1850
Dr. Mikaëla Adams
T TH 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Bishop Room 105

This course surveys American Indian history from the 1850s to the present, focusing on how the continent’s indigenous people negotiated dramatic changes in their lives. Using an ethnohistorical methodology, which considers the writings of anthropologists and archaeologists as well as historians, students will develop an understanding and appreciation for Native and non-Native cultures, federal policies and local adaptations, systems of domination, and efforts at resistance. The major objectives of this course are for students to (1) learn about the indigenous people of North America, (2) develop an understanding of ethnohistory as a methodology, (3) hone critical thinking and analytical skills, (4) learn how to read and analyze primary and secondary sources, and (5) improve writing skills.

 

HIS 327-1        The Rise and Fall of American Slavery
Dr. Anne Twitty
T TH 02:30 PM – 03:45 PM
Bishop Room 112
This course will explore the rise and fall of slavery in what became the United States from its colonial origins in 1619 through the end of Reconstruction in 1877, with an eye toward placing American slavery in a broader Atlantic context. We will examine the economic, racial, religious, cultural, legal, and political underpinnings of the institution, and evaluate the profound ways in which it shaped—and continues to shape—American society. We will analyze how American slavery was understood and experienced by both blacks and whites and consider the ways in which the stories we tell ourselves about American slaves and slavery have evolved over time. This course will conclude with a look at the impact of emancipation on black life in America and slavery’s enduring legacy.

 
HIS 330-1        The History of Mississippi
Mr. Thomas “Jack” Carey
M W F 01:00 PM – 01:50 PM
Lamar Room 404
This course covers the history of Mississippi from first settlements to the present. Key topics include: encounters between European groups and native peoples; the fate of Chickasaws and Choctaws in the state; the “Flush Times” of the 1830s; slavery in antebellum Mississippi; the crisis of the 1850s and secession; the ordeal of the Civil War; Reconstruction and Redemption; the “Revolt of the Rednecks” and conservative responses; the origins of Jim Crow and the nature of race relations in the state; the state’s literary scene; the Great Depression and the effects of federal economic policies; the impact of two world wars on the state; the migration of white and black Mississippians within and outside the state; the development of the black freedom and white resistance movements; political realignment and economic development in the late-nineteenth century; and current affairs and key contemporary debates in Mississippi.

Students will develop their analytical and writing skills by completing daily reading assignments, participating in class discussions, writing several papers, and taking mid-term and final exams.

In addition to selected documents, excepts, and articles, possible book-length readings include: Ralph Eubanks, Ever Is a Long Time; William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!; Walter Johnson, River of Dark Dreams; J. Todd Moye, Let the People Decide; William Alexander Percy, Lanterns on the Levee; Curtis Wilkie, Dixie; and Eudora Welty, Delta Wedding.


 
HIS 330-2        The History of Mississippi
Mr. Thomas “Jack” Carey
M W F 11:00 AM – 11:50 AM
Barnard Observatory 105
This course covers the history of Mississippi from first settlements to the present. Key topics include: encounters between European groups and native peoples; the fate of Chickasaws and Choctaws in the state; the “Flush Times” of the 1830s; slavery in antebellum Mississippi; the crisis of the 1850s and secession; the ordeal of the Civil War; Reconstruction and Redemption; the “Revolt of the Rednecks” and conservative responses; the origins of Jim Crow and the nature of race relations in the state; the state’s literary scene; the Great Depression and the effects of federal economic policies; the impact of two world wars on the state; the migration of white and black Mississippians within and outside the state; the development of the black freedom and white resistance movements; political realignment and economic development in the late-nineteenth century; and current affairs and key contemporary debates in Mississippi.

Students will develop their analytical and writing skills by completing daily reading assignments, participating in class discussions, writing several papers, and taking mid-term and final exams.

In addition to selected documents, excepts, and articles, possible book-length readings include: Ralph Eubanks, Ever Is a Long Time; William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!; Walter Johnson, River of Dark Dreams; J. Todd Moye, Let the People Decide; William Alexander Percy, Lanterns on the Levee; Curtis Wilkie, Dixie; and Eudora Welty, Delta Wedding.
HIS 332-1        The South in the 20th Century
Mr. Thomas “Jack” Carey
M W F 09:00 AM – 09:50 AM
Bishop Room 112
This course examines the history of the American South in the twentieth century. (Certain topics will take us back into the late-nineteenth century and forward into the twenty-first century.) Key topics include: the rise of political demagoguery; the origins of segregation and the nature of race relations; the importance of family and gender roles in Southern life; the Great Depression and the effects of federal economic policies; the Southern Renaissance and the region’s literary and arts scenes; the migration of white and black Southerners within and outside of the region; the impact of two world wars on the region; the development of the black freedom and white resistance movements; political realignment and economic development in the late-nineteenth century; and the meaning of regional identity in the contemporary South.

Students will develop their analytical and writing skills by completing daily reading assignments, participating in class discussions, writing several papers, and taking mid-term and final exams.

In addition to selected documents, excepts, and articles, possible book-length readings include: W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk; William Falk, Rooted in Place; William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying;  Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin, The Making of a Southerner; Jennifer Ritterhouse, Growing Up Jim Crow; and C. Vann Woodward, The Burden of Southern History.

 
HIS 332-2        The South in the 20th Century         
Dr. Ryan Fletcher
M W F 01:00 PM – 01:50 PM
Barnard Observatory 105
This course examines the economic, cultural, and political history of the South from the late nineteenth century to the conclusion of the twentieth century.   Lectures and assigned readings will concentrate our discussions on what C. Vann Woodward branded “the search for southern identity” in the twentieth century.  History 332 will accentuate how regional constructions of class, race, and gender defined the pursuit of southern identity.  Emphasized themes will include:  the legacies of the Civil War, sharecropping, modifications to cotton-based agriculture, segregation, disenfranchisement, the violence of racism, Populism, the plight of laborers, the persistence of poverty, the implications of the New Deal for the region, the civil rights movement, immigration, Sun Belt economics, urban growth, the emergence of environmental concerns, the conservative politics practiced in the final decades of the twentieth century, and the ongoing struggles for equality in the contemporary South.  In addition, History 332 will investigate how the ferment of the twentieth century invited southerners with diverse identities to create distinctive cultural expressions in their music, literature, religion, symbols, and sports.

Students enrolled in History 332 should anticipate: a rigorous schedule of weekly readings, quizzes on the assigned readings, engaging class discussions, a midterm exam, two research papers, and a final exam.

HIS 334-1        The Blue and the Gray
Dr. John Neff
T TH 01:00 PM – 02:15 PM
Bishop Room 101
 

This course offers an exploration of the military experience of the American Civil War, from the secession winter of 1860-61 to the war’s last days in June 1865.  Our primary focus will be combat; we will investigate the experience of  individual soldiers, the campaigns of armies, and the societies which ordered and supported that military expression of the political will, but always with the goal of understanding how the individual and national experience of war proved to be a powerful agent of change.  Additionally, in order to better understand the persistence of the Civil War in American society and culture, we will conclude the semester with an examination of how commemoration has shaped our public and private memories of the war and its soldier dead.



 

HIS 337-1        History of Religion in the South
Dr. Charles R. Wilson
T TH 01:00 PM – 02:15 PM
Bishop Room 112
 

This class will trace the development of religion in the American South. It will begin with the colonial era, examine the rise of evangelicalism and how that tradition became the dominant one in the South, trace the emergence of the sectional conflict between North and South and the role of religion in it, discuss the religious meanings of the Civil War and its aftermath, examine the expansion of evangelical churches after the war, consider the role of Catholics and Jews in the South, study developments in the early twentieth century, and conclude with religion’s role in the civil rights movement and the rise of the Religious Right. The course will also look at religion’s role in such creative expressions as music, literature, and films.

Four books are required reading. We will discuss each book in class and there will be a short quiz on each. There will be a midterm exam and a final exam. The other requirement is an oral history project, based around religion and culture.

Texts:  Christine Heyrman, Southern Cross
 Paul Harvey, Redeeming the South
Edward Larson, Summer for the Gods
Will Campbell, Brother to a Dragonfly
 

 

HIS 341-1        The Darwinian Revolution
Dr. Theresa Levitt
M W F 01:00 PM – 01:50 PM
Bishop Room 107
 

History 341 examines the origins and consequences of the idea of evolution. Going from the 17th century to the present, it traces the idea from the formation of the field of natural history to recent controversies over the teaching of evolution in school. It focuses on the work of Charles Darwin, as well as the related issues of materialism, eugenics, and the relation between science and religion.
 
HIS 353-1        Roman Empire
Dr. John Lobur
T TH 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Hume Room 107
A survey course in the history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Augustus beginning in 31 B.C. through the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 A.D. (Same as Clc 314)

HIS 355-1        Europe-Late Middle Ages and Renaissance
Dr. Frances Courtney Kneupper
M W F 09:00 AM – 09:50 AM
Bishop Room 107
 

In this course, we will study the important political, cultural, religious, and intellectual developments of late medieval/Renaissance Europe.  This is among the most dynamic periods in European history, which encompasses the Black Death, the Hundred Years War, Joan of Arc, the Papal Schism, the Hussite Revolution, the invention of print, the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, the Italian Renaissance, the Age of Exploration, and the Reformation.

Required Readings
Rosemary Horrox, The Black Death
Zachary S. Schiffman, Humanism and the Renaissance
Gene Brucker, Giovanni and Lusanna
Stephen Greenblatt, The Swerve
Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince
Additionally, there will be a required course reader.

 

HIS 355-2        Europe-Late Middle Ages and Renaissance
Dr. Frances Courtney Kneupper
M W F 11:00 AM – 11:50 AM
Bishop Room 101

In this course, we will study the important political, cultural, religious, and intellectual developments of late medieval/Renaissance Europe.  This is among the most dynamic periods in European history, which encompasses the Black Death, the Hundred Years War, Joan of Arc, the Papal Schism, the Hussite Revolution, the invention of print, the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, the Italian Renaissance, the Age of Exploration, and the Reformation.

Required Readings
Rosemary Horrox, The Black Death
Zachary S. Schiffman, Humanism and the Renaissance
Gene Brucker, Giovanni and Lusanna
Stephen Greenblatt, The Swerve
Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince

Additionally, there will be a required course reader.
HIS 356-1        Reformation Europe, 1517-1648
Dr. Jeffrey Watt
M W F 01:00 PM – 01:50 PM
Bishop Room 103
This course will examine the religious, cultural, political, and social developments in Europe for the period 1517-1648.  We will examine the impact of the so-called magisterial Protestant reformers, such as Martin Luther and John Calvin, as well as the importance of the Radical, Anglican, and Catholic Reformations.  This course will also touch on themes such as witchcraft, the growth in monarchical power, and women and the family in early modern Europe.

Tentative reading assignments include:
Roland Bainton, Here I Stand!  A Life of Martin Luther
Barbara Diefendorf, The Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre: A Brief History with Documents
Henry Kamen, The Spanish Inquisition: A Historical Revision
Mary Laven, Mission to China: Matteo Ricci and the Jesuit Encounter with the East
Brian Levack, The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe, 3rd edition
Steven Ozment, The Bürgermeister’s Daughter: Scandal in a Sixteenth-Century German Town
Paper Assignments and Exams:
One mid-term and a final exam.  Students will be required to write either two shorter papers (5-7 pages) based on the required readings or one longer paper (10-15 pages) on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor.
HIS 366-1        Late Imperial and Revolutionary Russia
Dr. Joshua First
M W F 02:00 PM – 02:50 PM
Bishop Room 101
This course examines the major developments of Russian history from the late-19th century to the foundation of the Soviet Union in the early 1920s, emphasizing the origins and culmination of the Russian Revolution.  During this period, the Russian Empire embarked on a long and difficult process of economic, social and cultural development: During the 1860s, Russia became the last European country to abolish the institution of serfdom.  Along with this major reform of social relations came concerted efforts at industrialization and a partial liberalization of the political system.  Nonetheless, major resistance to the imperial Russian state also emerged during this time.  Students and intellectuals, and later, industrial workers and peasants, protested the maintenance of a repressive state, along with the consequences of the country’s rapid movement toward modernity.  By the early 20th century, the Russian autocracy proved unable to resist the social forces that its own desperate attempts at modernization had helped create.
In order to understand this era on its own terms as well as in light of the revolution that would bring it to a cataclysmic end, we will study the swirling currents of Russian and Western thought that clashed and combined to form a uniquely Russian cultural mix in the waning years of the Russian Empire and the dawn of the Soviet Union.  We will examine the problems of economic development, imperial expansion (and contraction), religious and secular culture, and the successive periods of war, reform and revolution that characterized this fascinating era of Russian history.



 

HIS 375-1        History of Medieval Christianity
Dr. Lester Field
T TH 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Hume Room 203
In seminar and lecture format, this course examines major events and trends in the development of Christian doctrines and disciplines from the time of the legalization of Christianity under Constantine to the dawn of the Protestant Reformation. Students who successfully complete this course will have gained an elementary knowledge of medieval Christianity.

Since both lectures and class discussion presuppose that the student has done the reading assigned for the week, the mid-term and final exam will hold the student accountable for all the reading, which is the essential component of each class. Class discussion is a key to understanding this reading and not a substitute for it.

The exams consist of two halves. The first half will consist of eighteen short-answer identifications of significant persons or items, each worth three points. Each point corresponds to a portion of identification 1) by century, 2) by city, province, or kingdom, and 3) by historical significance. Partial credit is therefore possible, even likely. The second half will consist of an full-length essay question.

For classroom participation, there are only three possible grades: an A for those who contribute questions and discussion regularly, a C for those who attend regularly, and a F for those conspicuous by the absence. Tardiness and sleeping in class constitute disruptive absences. Despite the fact the classroom participation accounts for a relatively small percentage of the final grade, this percentage can have a decisive effect on the final grade. An A in classroom participation “bumps” a grade by half a grade, so that a student otherwise earning a B+, for example, would get an A- as a final grade. By the same token, an F “drops” a final grade a full grade.

Required Texts:
Roberta Anderson and Dominic Bellenger, Medieval Religion:  A Sourcebook (2007)
Giulio D’Onofrio, History of Theology: The Middle Ages (2008)
Hillgarth, Christianity and Paganism (1986)
Lynch, The Medieval Church (1992)
Placher, Readings in the History of Christian Theology Vol. 1 (1988)
Tierney, Middle Ages 1 (1999)
Course requirements and percentage of final grade:
Class participation      10%     Attendance and discussion
Essays                          20%     See below
Midterm                      20%     Bring blue book(s)
Final                            50%     Bring blue book(s)
HIS 383-1        Muslim World: Origins to the Middle Ages
Dr. Nicolas Trèpanier
T TH 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Bishop Room 101
This course offers a survey of the history of the Muslim world, from its origins to the thirteenth century. We will pay particular attention to the context in which Islam was born and the life of its founder Muhammad; the “golden age” of the life of the Prophet and his immediate successors, which continues to inform current debates such as the Shi’i/Sunni divide; the rapid establishment of a united Muslim empire ranging from Spain to India and its ultimate disintegration; and the interaction between Islam and the Christian world through intellectual interactions, along frontiers and during the Crusades.
The course will follow a chronological approach to the main events in the history of the Muslim peoples while, in parallel, exploring a number of key themes in the social, intellectual and artistic history of the region. Themes discussed will include Islam as a religion and social phenomenon, Islamic law, Sufism (Islamic mysticism), identity and ethnicity, literature, philosophy and science.
HIS 387-1        Modern Africa
Dr. Mohammed Bashir Salau
M W F 11:00 AM – 11:50 AM
Bishop Room 103
This course surveys African history from the nineteenth century to the present. Significant political, economic and cultural developments will be analyzed. Some of the major topics to be considered include the early nineteenth century political mutations, the abolition of slave trade, the partition of Africa, African responses to European expansion, colonial rule, apartheid, and the political economy of the post colonial era. Attention will also be given to exploring the nature of relationship between the United States and Africa. After completing this course, students should: have gained a sound knowledge of major controversies in modern African history, have a better appreciation of the processes which shaped modern Africa, be more critical in interpreting information, and be able to effectively communicate history through writing and verbal statements. The format will be lecture and discussion.

HIS 392-1        Conquest and Resistance in Latin America, 1450-1800
Dr. Jesse Cromwell
M W F 10:00 AM – 10:50 AM
Lamar Room 404
This course surveys the colonial history of Latin America from 1492 to the formation of independent nations in the first decades of the nineteenth century.  Over the term, we will examine how Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans came into contact with one another and created two of the most culturally-diverse and integrated empires in the early modern world.  Simultaneously we will investigate changes taking place in the Spanish and Portuguese empires as they evolved from the proving grounds of explorers and adventurers into mature colonial societies and eventually into a multitude of autonomous and culturally-distinct nations.  Along the way, we will analyze historically significant topics such as European exploration and expansion, indigenous belief structures, slavery, racial intermixture, piracy, imperial rivalry, the development of American identities, cultural clash, religious syncretism, epidemic disease, gender and family politics, and colonial revolutions.
Major course readings may include:
Camila Townsend, Malintzin’s Choices: An Indian Woman in the Conquest of Mexico
Noble David Cook and Alexandra Parma Cook, Good Faith and Truthful Ignorance: A Case of Transatlantic Bigamy
Richard Boyer and Geoffrey Spurling, Colonial Lives: Documents on Latin American History 1550-1850

HIS 394-1        Late Imperial and Modern China    
Dr. Margaret Tillman
T TH 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Bishop Room 105
 

Course goals:  After taking this course, students should become “China literate”—or to understand the basic vocabulary and concepts that drove Chinese history and are still in play today. Students will practice those skills by submitting response papers in preparation for class discussions and debates.
Course content: This course introduces students to the history of modern China, from the late Ming dynasty to the present.  Students are not expected to have any prior knowledge of Chinese history.
Major questions will include: What differentiates a rebellion from a revolution, and how did China turn from rebellion to revolution from the Ming to the Communist era?  Did the Manchu conquest constitute a form of rebellion (or revolution)?  Was it an empire?  What role did ethnicity and nationalism play in the story of China’s ongoing revolutions?  What role did overseas Chinese experiences and foreigners play?  What are some of the structural and institutional difficulties of Chinese governance?  How and why are some regimes able to remain in power, and others not?
Grading:
Weekly discussion sessions (includes attendance): 20%
Weekly assignments: 10%
First Midterm (March 6): 20%
Second Midterm (April 17): 20%
Final (overview with heavy focus on the CCP): 30%
Required reading:
Jonathan D. Spence, The Search for Modern China.  Any edition.
Pei-kai Cheng and Michael Lestz with Jonathan Spence, The Search for Modern China: A Documentary Collection. Any edition.
Course reader and handouts.

 
HIS 394-2        Late Imperial and Modern China
Dr. Margaret Tillman
T TH 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Bishop Room 112
Course goals: After taking this course, students should become “China literate”—or to understand the basic vocabulary and concepts that drove Chinese history and are still in play today. Students will practice those skills by submitting response papers in preparation for class discussions and debates.
Course content: This course introduces students to the history of modern China, from the late Ming dynasty to the present.  Students are not expected to have any prior knowledge of Chinese history.
Major questions will include: What differentiates a rebellion from a revolution, and how did China turn from rebellion to revolution from the Ming to the Communist era?  Did the Manchu conquest constitute a form of rebellion (or revolution)?  Was it an empire?  What role did ethnicity and nationalism play in the story of China’s ongoing revolutions?  What role did overseas Chinese experiences and foreigners play?  What are some of the structural and institutional difficulties of Chinese governance?  How and why are some regimes able to remain in power, and others not?
Grading:
Weekly discussion sessions (includes attendance): 20%
Weekly assignments: 10%
First Midterm (March 6): 20%
Second Midterm (April 17): 20%
Final (overview with heavy focus on the CCP): 30%
Required reading:
Jonathan D. Spence, The Search for Modern China.  Any edition.
Pei-kai Cheng and Michael Lestz with Jonathan Spence, The Search for Modern China: A Documentary Collection. Any edition.
Course reader and handouts.



 

HIS 399-1        The Great Depression
Dr. Jarod Roll
T TH 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Bishop Room 103.
This course will examine the causes, experience and consequences of the Great Depression, the worst domestic crisis in modern American history. Our discussions will reveal how the economic collapse ushered in fundamental changes to the social, political and cultural shape of the United States. We will consider how Americans of all walks of life struggled to understand and cope with staggering unemployment, hunger, homelessness, and, at times, a lack of hope. In doing so, we will explore a range of issues, including debates over state intervention, the creation of the New Deal, the appeal of radical and reactionary alternatives, the rising power of labor unions, and the birth of anti-New Deal conservatism, while paying attention to the ways the crisis reshaped the lives of women and racial and ethnic minorities. Although our focus will remain primarily on the domestic story, we will also examine the impact of key international events, from the failure of peace in Europe to the global spread of Fascism to the return of world war. Lastly, we will consider how Depression-era debates and developments have influenced contemporary American life from the 1940s through the present day.
Each student will be required to complete in-class quizzes, essay assignments and examinations. The completion of assigned readings and participation in class discussions are essential.
Possible readings:
Kennedy, The American People in the Great Depression
McElvaine, Down and Out in the Great Depression
Ward, Big White Fog
HIS 400-1        “Examining and Remembering Slavery in the American Imagination”
Dr. Deirdre Cooper Owens
TH 04:00 PM – 06:30 PM
Bishop Room 326
This 400-level course will focus on American slavery and its legacies, emphasizing its interrelationship with politics, economy, religion, ideologies, culture, family life, migrations, and international relations. One of the core inquiries that frame this course is how everyday Americans gain access to understanding slavery, a centuries old institution that is older than the United States.  Moreover, how do Americans both embrace and deny the legacies slavery?  This course hopes to intellectualize the experiences of slavery, race, and memory
Slavery played a profound role in the history of the United States. The wealth created by the unpaid labor of African Americans helped to underwrite the country’s industrial revolution and subsequent economic strength. The wealth generated from slavery and the slave trade created tremendous political power for slaveholders and their representatives. African slaves brought with them their many cultures, languages, and values, which helped to shape America and its unique culture. Enduring a brutally oppressive system, African slaves developed a deep commitment to liberty and became a living testament to the powerful ideal of freedom.   David Blight states, “ . . . history and memory can be conflated or discretely preserved in use and meaning; it is important to establish their differences.”  This course is a perfect vehicle to not only examine history and memory but to refine it as well.
Class Objectives:  History 400 is the capstone course for the history major. In this class you will apply what you have learned over the last three years and produce a major piece of research and writing, otherwise known as a senior thesis. This course will be run as a research seminar. You will be expected to participate in class discussion and also learn to critique your classmates’ work. Central to the process of researching and writing a history paper is engagement with how historians go about exploring and writing about the past.
HIS 400-2        Women and Gender in Nineteenth-Century America
Dr. Anne Twitty
T 04:00 PM – 06:30 PM
Bishop Room 324
This capstone seminar for history majors will explore how gender shaped nineteenth-century America, with particular focus on the role of women in the nation’s social, cultural, political, legal, and economic history. Students enrolled in this course will learn the historiography of gender in nineteenth-century America and conduct both primary and secondary research on the subject. Their efforts will culminate in the production of a 20-page research paper, the findings of which will be presented at the conclusion of this course.

 
HIS 400-3        The American Constitution and Its Original Meaning
Dr. Jonathan Gienapp
T 04:00 PM – 06:30 PM
Bishop Room 326
 

Except for the Bible no single text has been the subject of as much modern interpretive scrutiny as the United States Constitution. This capstone seminar for history majors will explore the historical dimensions of its creation as well as the meaning that such knowledge should bring to bear on its subsequent interpretation. This course will primarily focus on the eighteenth-century origins, character, construction, and ratification of America’s fundamental law, but in light of the recent interest in recovering the document’s “original meaning,” this course will also consider what the original understanding of the Constitution in fact was. Students in this course will be exposed to the history of the Constitution’s construction as well as the scholarly disputes which have surrounded its study. They will also conduct significant primary and secondary source research on a topic related to early American constitutionalism which will culminate in a substantive research paper.

 


 
HIS 450-1        The Cold War in International Perspective
Dr. Chiarella Esposito
TH 01:00 PM – 03:30 PM
Bishop Room 333
 

This is one of the history senior capstone seminars whose primary objective is to instruct students about how to write a 25-page research paper. Paper topics will have to deal with the history of the Cold War in International Perspective, including but not limited to: the Postwar Settlement; the Origins of the Cold War; Reconstruction; the Berlin Crises; Decolonization; the “Third World” between the Superpowers; the Cuban Missile Crisis; Soviet-Chinese relations; the Korean War; Vietnam; Nuclear Deterrence; Détente; Protest Movements of the 1960s and 1970s; Terrorism; the Crisis of Communism; the 1989 Revolutions in Eastern Europe. The paper should be based both on primary and secondary sources.  (N.B.: the paper cannot deal primarily with American domestic policies or issues, but must center instead on events in other parts of the world.  US intervention in and/or relations with any country during the Cold War is an acceptable approach as long as non-American points of view and sources are included).

During the first five weeks of classes students will become acquainted with adequate research topics, learn to write footnotes and a bibliography correctly, and to distinguish primary from secondary sources. We will also have a quiz on a brief survey of major events and issues in the history of the global Cold War. Students will prepare PowerPoint presentations on chosen topics (instructor’s approval required).  The main purpose of these presentations will be to formulate questions on selected topics and thus help guide each individual student towards the choice of an appropriate research focus. The instructor will review PowerPoint files one or two days before the presentation due date. Students should speak clearly and loudly enough to be heard and understood by their classmates.

Grade distribution: Prospectus: 10%; Research Paper: first half 40%; Research Paper: second half/complete paper 40%; Quiz, Presentations in class: 10%.
HIS 450-2        Death in the Early Modern European World
Dr. Antoinette Sutto
M 04:00 PM – 06:30 PM
Bishop Room 326

Death is the great human universal. Attitudes toward death, however, and the customs that surround it, vary greatly across cultures and over time. This course will look at death from the Reformation through the early nineteenth century.  Potential topics include changing religious beliefs about death and the afterlife, ghosts, executions, the idea of a “good death”, violent deaths, funeral and mourning customs, developing medical definitions of death and, ultimately, views about the meaning of human life.         This class is also a seminar on the art and technique of historical research. Over the course of the semester, you will engage in a substantial research project on a topic related to the material of the course.

HONORS COURSES-Students must be enrolled in the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College or have permission from the History Department to take the following courses.
INST 316-1      Soccer Madness – From Brazil to the World
Dr. Oliver Dinius
T TH 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM
Honors College Room 107
This is a course about soccer’s emergence as the global sport, about many countries’ obsession with what they see as their ‘national’ sport, and about soccer obsession as a globalized phenomenon. The course will use Brazil, host of the 2014 World Cup, as its main case study, although other countries will receive coverage as well. Fueled by consistent on-the-field success over the last half-century, Brazilians of all ages and both sexes root for their national team, the seleção, with a passion that borders on obsession.
The first part of the course will be devoted to understanding Brazil’s soccer mania in its historical context. How did soccer become closely tied to national identity? Why did military governments promote soccer mania? When, why, and how did Brazilians come to believe that their team deserves to win every World Cup? The second part of the course explores soccer madness in Brazil from an interdisciplinary social science perspective. What does it mean for a very unequal nation that all Brazilians, from the slum dweller to high-rise apartment owner, root for the national team? What does hosting the 2014 World Cup mean for Brazil and Brazilians? How did family parties and massive public viewings with a carnevalesque atmosphere become the way to watch national team soccer?
In the third part of the course, students will pursue a research project that applies what they learned about soccer madness in Brazil to studying soccer culture in some other part of the world (preferably a ‘developing’ country, not a traditional European soccer nation!). The format for presenting this research project will be a simple website (using Google Sites) that uses small movies (YouTube!), sound, and of course text. Each student’s site will be a module in a collective website on global soccer madness.
While the course is limited to honors students, interested non-honors history majors with at least a 3.00 GPA may contact the instructor to request permission to be registered for the class.
HIS 399-2        Science and War in the Twentieth Century: An Interdisciplinary Exploration
Dr. Susan R. Grayzel and Dr. Susan Pedigo
T TH 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
Honors College Room 311
In this class, taught by Susan Pedigo, Professor of Chemistry, and Susan Grayzel, Professor of History, students will investigate the connection between advances in modern science and the rise of modern, total warfare.  Continuing in public ongoing conversations that these two scholars have been having for years, the class will be invited to investigate transformations in both science and warfare (from chemical weapons to rocketry to medical and surgical innovations including antibiotics and blood transfusions) and the cultural, political, and social contexts in which these developments occurred.   Using The Cambridge Illustrated History of Warfare edited by Geoffrey Parker as the core text, the course will expose students to primary texts and scholarship on science, technology, and twentieth-century intra and interstate conflict.  One of the course goals is to promote exploration of possible honors thesis projects related to the course themes by cutting across disciplinary boundaries in exciting ways.

 
HIS 399-3        “Race, religion and representations of Islam in the West after 9/11”
Dr. Vivian Ibrahim
T TH 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM
Honors College Room 311

9/11 represented a heightened global security threat, which also brought about intense public attention on domestic Islam and Muslims within the US. This course aims to examine how religion and ethnicity, focusing on Islam and Arabs, are viewed and represented in the aftermath of 9/11.
Students will examine Muslim communities in the United States—with special reference to New York—going beyond media headlines to question stereotypes in its various forms. They will learn about the complex role of religion in modern public life and space involving violence and peace. The aim of the course is to offer an insight into the history and diversity of more than six million Muslims in the US while integrating social, economic, political, as well as cultural approaches in order to gain a holistic understanding of the complexities of the politics of representation.